Friday, April 21, 2017

Ah--unicorn food

Mermaid Toast
I never heard of this before...but now I have. According to Liam Stack (NYT, Apr 19, 2017), unicorn food is playful, colorful food popularized by Instagram and other social sites.

Starbucks now sells unicorn Frappacinos on Wednesday (for 5 weeks). Like all unicorn food, this java is amped up by cuteness.

Some foods feature fruit in animal shapes, pastel marshmallows, or even a real horn and ears made of sugar.

Toast can be uicorned with vari-colored icings, sprinkles, etc.

Who kicked this off? A wellmess blogger in Miam named Adeline Waugh.

She started it by using beetroot natural dye to pop her food pix.

Of course, her creations were healthy, but the trend has now gone down other paths. Now, sugary sprinkles and weird frostings are involved.

Doesn't sound like a healthfest to me, but hey, sometimes we need some fun, too.

Right?


Thursday, April 20, 2017

More kids can read by first grade

A new study shows that kids entering first grade in 2013 had far better reading skills than similar students a dozen years ago.

Even low-schieving students saw gains in basic reading skills.  But that did not translate into better overall reading for the less-skilled students. The gap between them and the higher-skilled students actually widened--meaning, I guess, that the higher-skilled kids sprinted ahead.

Overall, though, good news, the researchers are Ohio State said. (Educational Researcher)

One take from the researchers was that lower-skilled kids needed more time just reading text and less time being drilled on basic skills.

The study involved 2,358 schools in 44 states, a total of 364,738 kids.

What is the takeaway if you have kids? In my view, it's that preschool is a good thing and that reading should be encouraged at home, too.

To me, though, the really important thing is a love of reading--to somehow instill that.  Reading for pleasure has made my trip through this vale of tears bearable.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Even little kids feel fat

A study done at Leeds Beckett University showed that children as young as age 6 worry about body image, Children as young as three are stigmatized because of their weight, too.

I remember being furious with my ex- because he looked at our toddler daughter and said, "Is she getting fat?"

As if I had not gone that whole route my whole life-starting with amphetamines, threats, insults, etc., when I was not yet in junior high.

The study investigator points out that weight stigma and discrimination greatly influence the change of suffering from mental health issues--such as stress and anxiety.

He says non-stigmatizing supportive health care is paramount, because stigma reduces the potential of all interventions of any kind.

Eating behavior has been associated with depression and mood--and your mood in turn impacts food choice and consumption.

Doctors, he noted, need to "prescribe" exercise to treat both mental and physical concerns.

I don't even know if that's the whole answer.

Everyone needs to be more conscious of this....all this.

Just today, a friend told me about an obese 25-yr-old who had a gallbladder attack. The friend said she was "not being mean, the girl is fat." Yes, obesity can increase the risk of this, but I also know "skinny" people with gallbladder stones. Why is "fat" always the first go-to?

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Hospital food--a new approach

I was hospitalized for 2.5 days last week. I noticed one big change. The food. Long the butt of jokes, hospital food used to be a tray of "dishes," ranging from mystery meatloaf , to a white roll with butter (nutritionless), to Jell-O cubes (ditto).

People loved to diss it.

This time, I noticed a large, laminated menu on the bedside table. It had pictures of luscious-looking food and categories such as Liquid Diet, Soft Diet, Regular Diet.

Apparently food at this hospital is not delivered a set times. You order--like room service. They arrive with snappy little bellboy hats on--but despite the incredibly heavy lids and plates, it's is cold anyway.

I know from blogging about this that this is an attempt to improve "customer service." But may I point out several things:

--The menu was on a table too far for me to reach--so I had to call a nurse to get me a menu. Then I needed to fish out the phone.

--I did not have my glasses the first day and could not read it. I ordered by the pictures. The nurse dialed the number.

--It was up to an hour to arrive.

--Your guests could eat--but they had to pay a pretty hefty fee.

I ordered once one day, twice the next...too much trouble. I did not have much of an appetite anyway, but wanted to eat something to heal, to gain strength.

And I wondered what if you were on say, a liquid diet and ordered a hamburger anyway--would they forbid it? Would you get in a big fight?

I missed the Jell-O cubes, I guess. the food--when it arrived--was regular old hospital food anyhow, The pictures lied.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Report from your hospital insider

I missed posting for two days because I was in the hospital. One service I provide is getting all the diseases and problems so my readers don't have to.

I posted Wednesday, but was in agony from 6 am that day. I have made a reference (scroll down) to having a hernia. In the crazy mess our health care system is these days, and the difficulty I have with mobility with arthritis and no car, I had finally gone to the ER with the huge lump, knowing I could get tests and a diagnosis in one place. No trip for imaging, no trip for labs, no appts only on my kid's day off, etc.

They allayed my fears that is was cancer and said to consult a surgeon. Getting that appt took three weeks. We finally cabbed to him. He said since I have atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat), I would need a cardiologist to clear me. I had fired eight of them, but made an appt three weeks hence with a ninth. In turn, THAT guy wanted me to get two tests, which then had to be approved by my Medicare HMO and then scheduled. We had gotten one done.

Last Wednesday, the pain was horrible. I toughed it out all day and night and then the next AM, Thursday, we cabbed back to the ER. They said come back if it got worse--so I figured that was my doctor. I didn't even know. After another CT scan, they said the hernia was strangulated--meaning to a life and death point that could kill intestinal tissue.

The surgeon I had seen was not available and another doctor from his group took over and operated within an hour of seeing me. The intestinal tissue had not died (relief) and I woke up with five incisions, glued together with lavender skin glue (cool?).

The next day and a half in the hospital was a nightmare--so many tubes, could not turn over with no stomach muscles or knees to flip me, could not get up...ugh. I finally got out Sat afternoon after waiting 2 hours and 45 mins for the in-hospital doc to spring me (where the heck was he?).

I feel tired now, but the incision pain is greatly better this AM.

They said the hernia has probably been growing since I had a hysterectomy 33 yrs ago.

I will talk about hospital food--maybe tomorrow. I love all of you and am glad to be blatting away again.