Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Kids don't need sports drinks

Many youngsters in after school sports drink sports drinks. After all, they see pro athletes drinking these.

But the average recreational athlete does not play at the intensity of a pro and thus may not need the extra sugar and salt in a sports drink.

You need a solid 45 minutes of exercise to need that, says Matthew Silvis, MD, director of primary care sports medicine at Penn State.

Energy drinks are also at issue.  Pro athletes sometimes drink these for the added boost from caffeine.

Katie Gloyer, MD, a primary care sports medicine doc at Penn State, does not recommend energy drinks--even for pro athletes.

It's better to hone your skills and practice more rather than rely on these drinks, she says.

For children and teens, energy drinks can even be dangerous--the contents are not well regulated and can contain several doses of harmful products, which an elevate blood pressure and cause heart arrhythmias.

The focus needs to be on WATER.  After playing 30- or 45-minute halves, young people should have a water break--with maybe fresh orange slices or maybe a granola bar.

What is best for post-work out recovery? Chocolate milk! This has the perfect combo of fat, proteins, and carbs to help your system recover.

But overall--think water. Otherwise, you may take in more calories than you burn exercising.


No comments: