Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Removing breast implants--tricky

I know I sound like a dope for saying this, but the plastic surgery show on E! Channel, BOTCHED, is back--and I missed it. It is such an entertaining mix of trans-this, trans-that, weird bodily obsession, physician showboating, etc, I love it. I cannot lie.

In the episode I saw a female impersonator had a burst breast implant--basically, a wad of goo, that had to be cleaned out.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 400,000 women in the US had breast implant surgery in 2016 (cosmetic augmentation and reconstruction from cancer surgery).

At year seven, half of all implants need to be removed. They do not last a lifetime, says Constance M. Chen, MD, a plastic surgeon in NYC.

They can cause trouble:

--They are foreign bodies or substances, so the body forms a capsule around them. This shell can become painful. It can also account for that stuck-on half-tennis ball look.

--They can get infected.

--They can push through the skin.

--Under investigation by the FDA--whether there is a link to a rare immune system cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.

What is involved in removing:

--A complete capsulectomy--time-consuming procedure involving removing not only the implant but the shell around it. This can involve peeling tissue off the lungs, in some cases.

--After removal, the patient may face a breast lift, fat transfer, implant replacement, or even natural tissue free flaps.

If you have large breasts and small implants, you may get a pleasing result with removal alone. The opposite goes for small breast with large implants--can end up looking like collapsed pillowcases.

You might want to hang onto your "naturals." Think?

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